Ten Things That You Did Not Know About General George Custer

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George Custer was born on December 5th, 1839, in, Ohio. He joined the US cavalry and was to become one of the best-known men in America. He was widely seen as a national hero by some and also a national disgrace.  George Armstrong Custer rose to fame in the American Civil War, however, he won everlasting fame some ten years later because of his catastrophic defeat at the battle of Little Big Horn. Ironically, it was his defeat that made him secure the everlasting fame that this most ambitious of men sought all through his colorful life and career.

Many believe that the General was personally responsible for the defeat at the Battle in which he died. He was a daring man and a brilliant leader of men and had proved himself to be one of the finest cavalry officers of the American Civil War. Indeed, he was an almost mythical figure in the Union army. However, he was also a poor strategist and his need for glory and recognition clouded his judgment.

custer 1
Custer on the left with Lincoln and other Union generals

These qualities meant that he was responsible for the defeat at the Battle of the Little Big Horn and his own death.

The Battle of the Big Horn was the best-known defeat inflicted by the Native American tribes upon the American army for almost a century. A  force of 200 experienced cavalrymen was killed by the Native Americans.  Custer unit was annihilated by the Lakota Sioux and their allies the Cheyenne. Among the unit of some 200 men that were killed by the Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne on a hot day on June 25, 1876, were some members of Custer’s family. In total four members of the extended Custer family, was to die in the battle. These included his eighteen-year-old nephew Henry Reed, the son of his sister. His brother-in-law was also killed. During the battle, his two younger brothers were also killed. One of whom,  Thomas had won the medal of honor twice in the American Civil War.

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  • Merrill Henderson

    My correction about Pg 8 should read “Custer’s carrer that he” needs the word “what” between career and that.

    • admin

      Why Dont you come and work with us?

  • Robert Hagar

    Not one mention of Custer’s hometown.
    Monroe, Michigan where he grew up and we live among his descendants today.
    We have the Custer farm.
    The Cemetery where his family are buried.

    • Ed

      Hi

      Thanks for the interesting facts- I hope to add this to the article.

      Ed

  • Patricia

    “These included his eighteen-year-old nephew’s the son of his sister, Henry Reed.”

    Pretty sure the sister wasn’t Henry. The name should precede “his eighteen-year-old…” and should be followed by a comma.

    Sorry..it’s a pet peeve, left over from 8th-grade English.

    • Ed

      thanks- good point

  • Dave Smith

    The caption under the photo of Lincoln with McClellan and staff ID’s Custer as the officer on the far left. That officer in fact is Col. Delos B. Sackett, not Custer. Custer is on far right. If you notice the blurred image to Custer’s right, next to the tent, and the blurred multiple images of Custer’s legs and boots in the image it would appear that Custer was not intended to be in the photo, but walked into the shot as it was being exposed (exposure times for photos back then were very long), in effect, photobombing the image.

    • Ed

      Hi

      Thanks, Dave- for the interesting information.

      Ed

    • The image may have been reversed at printing. As the swords of the officers all appear on their left. A closer examination might reveal more. I noted no side arms on the right. Just a thought.

      • Ed

        Thanks Robert- a good point!

  • Dave Smith

    Interesting article. There are two photographs in the article of Custer with general, one on horseback and the other seated in chairs. The other general in both photos is General Alfred Pleasonton, Custer’s commanding officer at the time.

    • Ed

      Hi

      thanks again- we are glad that you like our article. I hope to use your information in the future.

  • Gary Ashley

    Here is a real interesting fact about Custer he fathered a child with a Cheyenne women. His grandson were in the Wounded Knee occupation in 73 supporting the American Indian Movement.

    • Ed

      Thanks- that is very interesting. Really appreciate your comment

      Thanks Ed

  • Janie Young

    I thought this was a great piece, but the comments I find even more fascinating. Custer and that time have always been of great interest to me. I found Will Hutchison’s book Artifacts of the the Battle of Little Bighorn. Just a piece of Custer’s life, but an important one obviously. But to see the items of the day in great photos really puts the events of that time into perspective. A great coffee table type photo essay book!

    • Ed

      Thanks for reading our article. Glad you like it!

  • jack kegg

    enjoyed the article. A Book of interest is Blaine Burkey’s Custer Come At Once.

    • Ed

      Thanks- I hope to check out that work some time

  • Lee Unterborn

    In fact Custer’s body was mutilated. The Indians cut off his penis and testicles and stuffed them down his throat. It was not made public by the Army out of respect for his wife and family. His brother Tom was unrecognizable, his face and skull had been pounded flat, the only way he could be recognized was by several tattoos he had.

    • Ed

      thanks for your fascinating facts

  • Dennis Reust of Stillwater, OK

    Here’s something the author probably does not know. Custer kept a squaw who was called “Morning” or “Morning Glory” by her neighbors. After Custer’s death, Morning lived on a farm outside Kingfisher, OK with a man called “Ike”. She did not marry Ike so she could continue receiving an allotment for being Custer’s Widow. My mom’s family lived near “Ike’s place” and Grandpa Ernest Toepfer drove Morning in his car every month to receive this allotment. Upon her death, Grandpa and others helped bury Morning in a secret, unmarked grave with all her worldly possessions. Her possessions included a chest covering (bib? apron?) of silver coins fastened together. I have more of this history which was written after interviewing my uncle who was older than my Mother, and had more memories of her. you are welcome to contact me if you are interested. My uncle made statements to her tribal office, and I’ve passed this information to one Custer historian, but I’ve not yet seen it published.

    • Ed

      Hi

      Thanks so much for that information- really interesting!